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Undergraduate ProGRAM


Curriculum
Requirements

 

THE FIELD OF CHEMISTRY

Chemistry probes the fundamental concepts of nature and works to solve society's problems. In sometimes unsuspected ways, these endeavors come together a fundamental research study occasionally leads to a useful product and the applied project can unearth a previously unknown phenomenon. Chemistry is obviously intrinsically important, but it also has a significant impact on other disciplines. For instance, if we are to understand the complexities of biology it is essential to understand why sugar molecules or proteins or DNA molecules behave as they do. Chemists are interested in the structure of molecules and the properties of materials and in the reactions that convert one material into another. As an example, they want to understand why some polymers are elastic and they want to develop new polymers based upon this knowledge. Chemists provide perhaps the most important resource for solving energy and environmental problems.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

Because there are these needs for people to solve problems using chemistry, there is a strong and continuing demand for trained chemists. Many graduates are employed in research and development laboratories, but there are also job opportunities in government, teaching, health, and business. The chemistry program at the University of Minnesota is nationally recognized. Students receive broad training in the major subfields of chemistry and learn to apply modern techniques with a thorough understanding. Students receive the full benefits of a modern research facility and access to the sophisticated instruments needed for chemical research. The department offers many research opportunities for undergraduate students.

The Department of Chemistry offers a Bachelor of Arts degree through the College of Liberal Arts (CLA) and a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree through the College of Science and Engineering (CSE). The requirements for these degrees are similar. The total credit requirement is the same for both degrees. The curriculum offers flexibility for students to design and prepare for the career path of their choice. By selecting appropriate electives it is possible for a student to construct a program with emphasis in special interest areas, such as bioscience, chemical physics, education, environmental chemistry, and materials chemistry. A chemistry degree may be combined with a degree in chemical engineering. This double major program is easy to plan and is excellent preparation for a career in the chemical industry or for graduate study in chemistry or chemical engineering. Students planning to teach chemistry and physics in secondary schools can obtain a Bachelor's degree in chemistry and apply to the College of Education's postbaccalaureate licensure program in Science Education. A chemistry minor is also available through both CSE and CLA.

Program Facilities And Resources

The Department of Chemistry is housed in two adjacent buildings, Smith and Kolthoff Halls on the University mall. The Science and Technology Library, housed in Walter Library, immediately to the north of Smith Hall and connected by an underground corridor, subscribes to all the major journals of interest to chemists and has an unusually extensive book collection.

  • There are 35 active faculty members with a full time staff of 40 employees.
  • There are approximately 270 undergraduate Chemistry majors through the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Science and Engineering.
  • There are approximately 250 Graduate students in the Ph. D. program and 20 Graduate students in the Masters program in the Analytical, Biological, Inorganic, Materials, Organic, Physical and Chemical Physics areas.
  • Both Smith and Kolthoff Hall recently completed renovation project with up-to-date teaching laboratories, special instrumentation labs and research labs.
  • The Chemistry Department has a Microcomputer facility for undergraduate use.
  • Housed in the department are a microcomputer lab, NMR and Mass Spectrometry Labs, computer & electronic services, glass technology services, and a fully equipped research stockroom.

High School Preparatory Courses

Students planning to major in chemistry should have taken the following courses in high school:

  • English 4 years
  • Mathematics 4 years (beginning and intermediate algebra, trigonometry, and geometry)
  • Chemistry 1 year
  • Physics 1 year
  • Biological Science 1 year
  • Language 2 years of a single second language
  • Social Studies 2 years including U.S. History

Prerequisites

Because completion of the general chemistry sequence is prerequisite for advanced coursework in the major, students planning to major in chemistry are advised to complete General Chemistry during the freshman year. Also note that math and physics are required for upper division chemistry courses and should be completed during the second year.

Transfer students must have transfer courses evaluated by a faculty adviser in 135 Smith Hall to determine point of entry into the major program and should consult the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Campus Bulletin for a description of general graduation requirements.

THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL TRAINING GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION

Scope of the Chemistry Program

An active, modern program of chemical education at the undergraduate level must do more than simply train professional chemists. Chemistry, the central science, is an important component of many disciplines and should be made accessible to all students seeking a liberal education. The Chemistry department should contribute actively to the raising of the level of scientific literacy of all students. The nature of any particular undergraduate program is governed by the overall educational objectives and resources of the institution. The entire program should effectively serve all students within the institution by recognizing their different needs, interests, and career goals.

Curriculum Requirements

The principal purpose of the American Chemical Society's program of approval of undergraduate curricula is to help departments provide chemistry majors with a sound education in the fundamental areas of modern chemistry. The Committee on Professional Training believes that it can help departments best by setting general curricular goals rather than by specifying exact curricular structure, realizing that a department's curriculum should build on the strengths of the institution and its faculty. Programs as different in character as those with a major emphasis on fundamental principles and those that are strongly based on industrial applications have produced students who have gone on to have distinguished careers in chemistry. The Committee encourages departments to explore the many ways by which a curriculum can meet the guidelines that are described below.

Core Curriculum Requirements

Programs of study in chemistry curricula for majors and nonmajors can be organized in many ways to reflect the institution's mission, the available facilities, and the interests and capabilities of the students and faculty. Regardless of what organization is adopted, that part of the program specified as the core curriculum must be taken by all certifiable graduates and must include a minimum of 28 semester credit-hours of basic instruction with comparable emphasis on:

  • inorganic chemistry
  • chemical analysis and instrumental methods of analysis
  • organic and bioorganic chemistry
  • calculus-based physical chemistry
  • And at least 3 semester credit-hours of biochemistry must be taken.

The 28 semester credit-hours of study shall include the equivalent of 7 semester credit-hours (300-350 contact hours) of laboratory instruction distributed, not necessarily in equal proportions, among:

  • synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organic compounds
  • chemical and instrumental methods of analysis
  • experimental physical chemistry

Advanced Course Requirements.

The minimum requirements for the degree option in chemistry are at least 6 semester credit-hours of advanced courses that include sufficient laboratory work to bring the total laboratory hours to 500. The courses may include or even consist entirely of research that culminates in a comprehensive written report.

ACS Certification of Degree Program

Potential employers might ask you whether your degree program in chemistry was certified by the American Chemical Society. The CSE degree program (minimum of 40 credits of chemistry) meets the ACS certification requirements credit-wise but, depending upon which laboratory courses are taken, it may not meet the distribution requirements for laboratory instruction. The CLA degree program (minimum of 35 credits of chemistry) does not meet the ACS certification requirements but could easily be made to do so by the proper choice of advanced technical electives. Please consult an undergraduate studies advisor for further information.

GENERAL PROCEDURES for ADVISING IN CHEMISTRY

Planning The Major

In planning a chemistry major, students should see an undergraduate adviser in 135 Smith Hall as soon as they begin considering majoring in chemistry. Students develop their program in consultation with a faculty adviser. All majors must keep on file in 135 Smith Hall, a one-year plan of study for every term they are a major.

Advisors and Appointments

The Chemistry Advising Office (135 Smith Hall) is open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. five days a week. Stephanie Stathopoulos, Assistant to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, is the first contact for most undergraduate advising questions. The faculty input to the advising is handled by a small group of faculty (four at present including the Director of Undergraduate Studies) who rotate the advising duties. Each advisor is available a different day of the week. An advisor schedules 2-4 hours per day during which the advising duties have first priority. This means that advising appointments can be scheduled without consulting the faculty member, with the assurance that the appointment will be honored. As a rule the appointments are met in 135 Smith and not in the faculty member's office. Given this arrangement a student can always talk to someone in the advising office immediately and can usually see a faculty advisor in a day or less. Students are not assigned to specific advisors and are encouraged to see different advisors not only for the convenience of scheduling appointments but to receive different points of view. Notes are kept on each appointment so a different advisor is aware of the results of previous appointments.

Differences Between CLA and CSE Chemistry Degrees

  • Degrees: CLA -- Bachelor of Arts or CSE --Bachelor of Science in Chemistry
  • CSE program requires more technical courses.
  • CLA requires two years of a second language

What's the difference between a degree in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering?

Degrees in chemistry or chemical engineering are both excellent preparation for graduate study and a career in research. The Chemical Engineering degree is more specialized and includes more concentrated study in the discipline while a degree in chemistry, as with the other sciences, is more general and offers the student more opportunity to take courses in other areas. The Chemical Engineering degree is excellent preparation for immediate employment in industry, whereas a chemistry degree is designed as preparation for advanced or graduate study in chemistry or related fields such as medicine, biochemistry, chemical engineering, education, law or business. In general, a bachelors degree in engineering is more applied while a science degree is more fundamental and assumes continued, more specialized study in the science. If you like chemistry and can't decide between chemistry and chemical engineering, think about being a double major. The job you would do in industry will vary with each company. Generally, a Chemical Engineer with a bachelors degree will work in problem solving such as changing the method of manufacturing of a product. Chemical Engineers rarely if ever work at the molecular level; most of their work is in process scale up. A Chemist with a bachelors degree will typically do laboratory, bench chemistry, or research under the supervision of a PhD Chemist.

How do you get started?

Chemistry majors, whether in CSE or CLA, should be aware that the advising office is open to them and are urged to see an advisor as early as possible. Once a student is a major he or she is required to come in once a year to fill out a one-year plan in consultation with an advisor. Students are required to have their registration approved before Fall term, complying with your one-year plan; if there is a serious deviation you will be asked to discuss it with an advisor. Further, students are invited to discuss problems or questions with an advisor whenever the need.

CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM

General Requirements For All Majors

All required courses for the major including composition must be taken on A-F grading. All required courses must be completed with at least a "C-" grade. Transfer students must complete at least 10 credits of upper level chemistry courses here, including one laboratory course. Completion of a minimum of 120 credits is required for a B.S. in Chemistry degree (CSE) or for a B.A. degree (CLA). Any substitutions to the required courses must be formally approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (CSE--via petition; CLA--via program amendment).

CLA majors must file the CLA Degree Program by their 60th credit.

Major Requirements

35-40 credits in Chemistry

  • two courses in general chemistry (1061/1065 and 1062/1066)*
  • two lectures and one lab course in organic chemistry (2301, 2302, 2311)**
  • one lecture in inorganic chemistry (4701)
  • one lecture and a lab course in analytical chemistry (2101, 2111)
  • two lectures in physical chemistry (4501, 4502)
  • Advanced chemistry lectures (CSE 3 cr., CLA 0 cr.)
  • Selected from any non-required upper level course in chemistry.
  • Advanced chemistry labs (CSE three labs, CLA two labs)
  • Selected from Chem 4311 (Advanced Organic Laboratory), Chem 4111 (Intermediate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory), Chem 4511 (Advanced Physical Laboratory), Chem 4711 (Advanced Inorganic Laboratory) Chem 4223 (Polymer Laboratory). CSE students can substitute for the third lab 2 cr. of Directed Studies Research (Chem 4094), or, by petition, advanced labs of 2 credits or more at the 3XXX level or higher in science or engineering departments. CLA student can use Directed Studies (2094 or 4094) as one of the Adv Chem Labs (2 cr.)

* Honors General Chemistry 1071H/1075H and 1072H/1076H

** Honors Organic Chemistry 2331H and 23332H, and lab 2312H in the Fall Term

12 credits in Math

  • 1271 Calculus I
  • 1272 Calculus II
  • 2263 Multivariable Calculus

8 credits in Physics

  • 1301-1302, Introductory Physics and Laboratories (calculus level.)

3-4 credits Advanced Math or Physics Elective

  • CSE students only. Selected from Math 2243 (Linear Algebra and Differential Equations) or Phys 2303 (Introductory Physics III) or Phys 2503 (Modern Physics Principles) or Stat 3021 (Introduction to Probability and Statistics.)

3-6 credits Advanced Technical Electives

  • (CSE 6 cr., CLA 3 cr.) Selected from 3XXX- and higher-level courses of 3 credits or more in Chemistry, Biology, Biochemistry, Genetics, Cell Biology, Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, Math, Physics, Public Health, and Statistics.

Composition and Writing

  • 1011 University Writing and Critical Reading (4 cr.)
  • 4 Writing Intensive Requirements

The CLA program requires 2 years of a single second language.

Directed Studies (Chem 2094 or 4094)

Directed Studies is an excellent way to experience modern chemistry research first-hand. Chem 4094 can substitute for one of the required advanced chemistry labs or for an advanced technical elective but not both. To register for Chem 4094, you must be in upper division or have taken (or be taking) a 3xxx-level chemistry course. To receive credit for 4094, you must submit a comprehensive written report on your research project to your advisor. Laboratory research taken under Chem 2094 does not require a written report and can be taken at any time. If you wish to get credit for Chem 4094 the directed studies project must be with a member of the Chemistry faculty or a member from another department provided the project is in collaboration with someone from the Chemistry faculty. If the project outside the department is not in collaboration with a chemistry faculty member, it is possible, by petition only, to get credit for Chem 2094 provided the project has enough of a chemistry component. Prerequisites vary with each professor but some are willing to take on students as early as their Freshman year. To see what kind of undergraduate research projects are possible go to the research link. CLA students wishing to do a library research project to satisfy their Directed Studies requirement should register for 2 cr. of 2094; in this case a written report will also be required.

RECOMMENDED CURRICULUM

CSE Chemistry Semester Program Requirements

Freshman Year
Fall Semester (16 cr)
Spring Semester (16 cr)
Chem 1061 Chem Principles I (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Chem 1062 Chem Principles II (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Math 1271 Calculus I (4 cr)
Math 1272 Calculus II (4 cr)
Phys 1301 Physics I (4 cr)
Phys 1302 Physics II (4 cr)
Freshman Writing (4 cr)
Biol 1009 General Biology (4 cr)
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester (15 cr)
Spring Semester (16 cr)
Chem 2301 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr)
Chem 2302 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 2101 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr)
Chem 2311 Organic Chemistry Lab (4 cr)
Chem 2111 Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 cr)
Math 2243 or Phys 2303 or 2503 or
Math 2263 Multivariable Calculus (4 cr)
Stat 3021 Elective (3-4 cr)
Elective (3 cr)
Electives (5 cr)
 
Junior Year
 
Fall Semester (14 cr)
Spring Semester (15 cr)
Chem 4501 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr)
Chem 4502 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr)
Advanced Lab Elective (2-4 cr) *
Advanced Technical Elective (3 cr)
Advanced Technical Elective (3 cr)
Electives (9 cr)
Electives (6 cr)
 
   
Senior Year
 
Fall Semester (14cr)
Spring Semester (14 cr)
Chem 4701 Inorganic Chemistry Lect (3 cr)
Adv Lab Elect (2-4 cr) *
Advanced Chemistry Lect Elective (3 cr)
Electives (12 cr)
Advanced Lab Elective (2-4 cr) *
Electives (6 cr)

* Advanced Chemistry Lab Electives: Select three courses from the following:

Chem 4094 Directed Research (anythime); prereq any 4xxx or 5xxx Chem course
Chem 4111 Intermediate Analytical Chemistry Lab (spring semester); prereq Chem 4101
Chem 4311 Advanced Organic Chemistry Lab (fall and spring semester); prereq Chem 2311
Chem 4511 Advanced Physical Chemistry Lab (fall semester); prereq Chem 4501, 4502
Chem 4711 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab (spring semester); prereq Chem 4701
Chem 4223 Polymer Laboratory (spring semester); prereg 4221 or co-req Chem 4214

CLA Chemistry Semester Program Requirements

Freshman Year
Fall Semester (16 cr)
Spring Semester (16 cr)
Chem 1061 Chem Principles I (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Chem 1062 Chem Principles II (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Math 1271 Calculus I (4 cr)
Math 1272 Calculus II (4 cr)
Phys 1301 Physics I (4 cr)
Phys 1302 Physics II (4 cr)
Freshman Writing (4 cr)
Biol 1009 General Biology (4 cr)
 
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester (15 cr)
Spring Semester (15 cr)
2301 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr)
Chem 2302 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 2101 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr)
Chem 2311 Organic Chemistry Lab (4 cr)
Chem 2111 Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 cr)
Electives (8 cr)
Math 2263 Multivariable Calculus (4 cr)
 
Elective (3 cr)
 
   
Junior Year
 
Fall Semester (14 cr)
Spring Semester (15 cr)
Chem 4501 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr)
Chem 4502 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr)
Advanced Lab Elective (2-4 cr) *
Advanced Technical Elective (3 cr)
Electives (9 cr)
Electives (9 cr)
   
Senior Year
 
Fall Semester (14cr)
Spring Semester (14 cr)
Chem 4701 Inorganic Chemistry Lect (3 cr)
Electives (15 cr)
Advanced Lab Elective (2-4 cr) *
 
Electives (9 cr)
 

* Advanced Chemistry Lab Electives: Select two courses from the following:

Chem 4094 Directed Research (anythime); prereq any 4xxx or 5xxx Chem course
Chem 4111 Intermediate Analytical Chemistry Lab (spring semester); prereq Chem 4101
Chem 4311 Advanced Organic Chemistry Lab (fall and spring semester); prereq Chem 2311
Chem 4511 Advanced Physical Chemistry Lab (fall semester); prereq Chem 4501, 4502
Chem 4711 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab (spring semester); prereq Chem 4701
Chem 4223 Polymer Laboratory (spring semester); prereq 4221 or co-req Chem 4214

VARIOUS TRACKS AND DUAL DEGREES

CLASSIC TRACK

The Classic Track is designed for students planning to apply to graduate school in chemistry, or to work as a chemist in industry at the bachelor's level. Students planning to enter graduate school are strongly advised to take additional chemistry lecture and lab courses beyond the minimum required for their degree. Advanced lecture courses in mechanisms, polymers, synthesis and bioorganic will provide additional preparation for the Chemistry GRE and for graduate school proficiency examinations. Student should take at least one synthetic (4311 or 4711) and at least one instrumental (4111 or 4511) advanced lab. Students planning to enter industry are advised to take 4311 and 4111, since many jobs involve analytical or synthetic chemistry. Whether headed for graduate school or for industry, students are advised to take at least one additional chemistry lab chosen from the above four, and also to obtain significant research experience through Directed Studies (2094 or 4094). Careful selection of Advanced Technical Electives can also help focus on a specific area of interest.

BIOSCIENCE TRACK*

This curriculum is recommended for premedical chemistry majors. It incorporates all of the chemistry courses which are acceptable for a chemistry degree as well as the recommended premedical biology courses. The recommended course sequence is designed to prepare a student for the MCAT which is generally taken during the spring term of the third year. A chemistry degree via this curriculum is the same degree which is awarded after completion of the normal chemistry requirements and it will serve as adequate preparation for any chemistry career including graduate school. It is important to seek frequent advising from a chemistry advisor. All required courses, including composition, must be taken A-F. Some courses are offered during additional terms to those shown below; consult a chemistry advisor for major sequence changes.
CLA has a nice website for health science advising resources. You can download the health science planning sheets from this site. There are also two brochures on line: Preparing for Medical School and Preparing for Dental School. An on line reference and referral guide provides useful information about each health science program as well as other useful campus resources. This site also has links to all the health science program web sites and the CLA link database of internships/volunteer opportunities.

Freshman Year
Fall Semester (16 cr)
Spring Semester (16 cr)
Chem 1061 Chem Principles I (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Chem 1062 Chem Principles II (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Math 1271 Calculus I (4 cr)
Math 1272 Calculus II (4 cr)
Phys 1301 Physics I (4 cr)
Phys 1302 Physics II (4 cr)
Freshman Writing (4 cr)
Biol 1009 General Biology (4 cr)
   
Sophomore Year  
Fall Semester (15 cr) Spring Semester (16 cr)
Chem 2301 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 2302 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 2101 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr) Chem 2311 Organic Chemistry Lab (4 cr)
Chem 2111 Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 cr) Math 2243 or Phys 2303 or 2503 or Stat 3021 (3-4 cr) [CSE only]
Math 2263 Multivariable Calculus (4 cr) Biol 1002 Intro. Biology II (5 cr) OR
Elective (3 cr) Biol 3211/2005 Anim. Phys. (3 cr) Lab (1 cr)
   
Junior Year  
Fall Semester (14 cr) Spring Semester (15 cr) MCAT
Chem 4501 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 4502 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr)
Advanced Lab Elective (2 cr) Biol 4003 Genetics (3 cr)
BioC 3021 Biochemistry (3 cr) Electives (9 cr)
BioC 4025 Lab in Biochemistry (2 cr)  
Electives (4 cr)  
   
Senior Year  
Fall Semester (15cr) Spring Semester (14 cr)
Chem 4701 Inorganic Chemistry Lect (3 cr) Advanced Lab Elective (2 cr)
Advanced Chemistry Lect Elective (3 cr) Electives (12 cr)
Advanced Lab Elective (2 cr)  
Electives (7 cr)  

* Program layout does not contain all college or liberal education requirements.

EDUCATION TRACK*

The College of Education offers a 15-month postbaccalaureate program that leads to licensure to teach chemistry in middle and high school, and (with additional credits) a master of education (M.Ed.) degree in teaching. Chemistry majors wishing to enter this program after receiving the bachelor's degree will need additional credits as listed below. Further information concerning this program is available from the College of Education (360 Education Sciences Bldg, 625-3339).

Freshman Year  
Fall Semester (16 cr) Spring Semester (16 cr)
Chem 1061 Chem Principles I (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Chem 1062 Chem Principles II (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Math 1271 Calculus I (4 cr) Math 1272 Calculus II (4 cr)
Phys 1301 Physics I (4 cr) Phys 1302 Physics II (4 cr)
Freshman Writing (4 cr) Biol 1009 General Biology (4 cr)
   
Sophomore Year  
Fall Semester (15 cr) Spring Semester (16 cr)
Chem 2301 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 2302 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 2101 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr) Chem 2311 Organic Chemistry Lab (4 cr)
Chem 2111 Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 cr) Math 2243 or Phys 2303 or 2503 or Stat 3021 Elective (3-4 cr) [CSE only]
Math 2263 Multivariable Calculus (4 cr) Biol 1002 Molecular, Cell. & Dev Perspec. (4 cr)
   
Junior Year  
Fall Semester (14 cr) Spring Semester (15 cr)
Chem 4501 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 4502 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr)
Advanced Lab Elective (2 cr) Geo 1009 Earth Systems Science (4 cr)
Psy 1001 or GC 1281 Gen Psychology (4 cr) Phil 1005 or 3601 Scientific Reasoning (4 cr)
Ast 1001 Exploring the Universe (4 cr)  
   
Senior Year  
Fall Semester (14cr) Spring Semester (14 cr)
Chem 4701 Inorganic Chemistry Lect (3 cr) Advanced Lab Elective (2 cr)
Advanced Chemistry Lect Elective (3 cr) HSci (3814, 3331, 3332, or 3401) (3-4 cr)
Advanced Lab Elective (2 cr)  

* Program layout does not contain all college or liberal education requirements.

CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DUAL TRACK*

This program is designed for IT students who wish to obtain a double major in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Highlighted courses below are the additional Chemistry courses needed beyond the Chemical Engineering required courses (note: Chem 2121 replaces Chem 2101/2111.) Talk to an advisor in Chemistry about the options for Advanced Chem Lecture (1 needed) and Lab Electives (2 needed). Be sure to check with advisors in ChEn for appropriate program.

Freshman Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 1061 Chem Principles I (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Chem 1062 Chem Principles II (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Math 1271/1371 Calculus I (4 cr) + Math 1272/1372 Calculus II (4 cr) +
Phys 1301 Introductory Physics I (4 cr) Phys 1302 Introductory Physics II (4 cr)
Freshman Writing (4 cr) Biol with lab(4 cr)
   
Sophomore Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 2301 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 2302 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)
ChEn 2001 Material and Energy Balance (4 cr) Chem 4501 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr)
Math 2263/2374 Multivariable Calculus (4 cr) + Chem 2121 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr)
MatS 3011 Intro to the Science of Materials (3 cr) Math 2243/2373 Linear Algebra & Differential Equations (4 cr) +
   
Junior Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 2311 Organic Chemistry Lab I (4 cr) ChEn 3401 Jr ChEn Lab (2 cr)
Chem 4701 Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr) ChEn 3006 Mass Transfer and Separations (4 cr)
ChEn 3101 Chem Eng Thermodynamics (4 cr) ChEn 3102 Reaction Kin & Reactor Eng (4 cr)
ChEn 3005 Fluid & Heat Transfer (4 cr) ChEn 3201 Computational Methods in ChEn (3 cr)
  Advanced Chemsitry Lect or Lab Elective (2-3 cr)
   
Senior Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
ChEn 3701 Intro to Biomolecular Eng (3 cr) # Chem 4502 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr)
ChEn 4401 Chemical Engineering Lab I (3 cr) Chem 4214 Polymers (3 cr) ##
ChEn 4501 Chem Eng Process Design I (3 cr) ChEn 4502 Chem Eng Process Design II (2 cr)
ChEn 4601 Process Control (3 cr) Advanced Chemistry Lect or Lab Elective (2-3 cr)
Advanced Chemistry Lect or Lab Elective (2-3 cr)  

+ Math 1371, 1372, 2373, 2374 sequence is preferred by Chemical Engineering.
* Program layout does not contain all college or liberal education requirements.
# ChEn 3701 gets moved to Sr. year to accommodate Chem 4701.
## If you take Chem 4214 (not ChEn or MatS 4214) it will be your Adv. Chemistry Lecture Elective for the Chemistry requirements.

CHEMISTRY AND FOOD SCIENCE DUAL TRACK*

Food Science applies scientific principles to the manufacture, distribution, marketing, and consumer aspects of food. Food scientists apply the basic principles and techniques of many disciplines including chemistry, physics, economics, microbiology, nutrition, management, and marketing to food processing and preservation, new product development, and food marketing. The dual degree in chemistry will provide a broader foundation in fundamental science upon which you can develop a proficiency or area of specialization. Listed below are the science courses in the Food Science major and the core chemistry requirements. Students seeking this dual track should contact the appropriate college and departmental offices for further requirements.

Freshman Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 1061 Chem Principles I (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Chem 1062 Chem Principles II (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Math 1271 Calculus I (4 cr) Math 1272 Calculus II (4 cr)
Freshman Writing (4 cr) Phys 1301 Physics I (4 cr)
FScN 1102 Food: Safety, Risk & Tech. (3 cr) Biol 1009 General Biology (4 cr)
   
Sophomore Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 2301 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 2302 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)
Phys 1302 Physics II (4 cr) Chem 2311 Organic Chemistry Lab I (4 cr)
Math 2263 Multivariable Calculus (4 cr) MicB 3301 Biology of Microorganisms (5 cr)
FScN 3102 Intro. to Food Science (3 cr) BioC 3021 Biochemistry (3 cr)
FScN 2021 Intro Microbiology (4 cr) Comm 1101 Intro to Public Speaking (3 cr)
  FScN 1112 Principles of Nutrition (3 cr)
Junior Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 2101 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr) Advanced Chemistry Lecture Elective (3 cr)
Chem 2111 Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 cr) Advanced Chemistry Lab Elective (2 cr)
BBE 4744 Eng. Prin. for Biol. Scientists (4 cr) FScN 4121 Food Micro & Fermentation (3 cr)
FScN 4112 Food Chem & Functional Foods(3 cr) FScN 4122 Food Fermentation & Biotechnology (2 cr)
Biol 4003 Genetics (3 cr) Writ 3562 Technical & Professional Writing (4 cr)
  FScN 4332 Food Processing Operations (3 cr)
Senior Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 4501 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 4502 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 4701 Inorganic Chem Lect (3 cr) Advanced Chemistry Lab Elective (2 cr)
FScN 4312 Food Analysis (4 cr) FScN 4349 Food Science capstone (1-2 cr)
FScN 4131 Food Quality (3 cr) FScN 4-5xxx Food Science elective accompanying the Capstone (3-4 cr)
FScN 4311 Chemical Reactions in Food Systems (2 cr) Stat 3021 Intro. to Probability & Stats(3 cr)
FScN 4096 Professional Experience: Internship (3 cr)  

* Program layout does not contain all college or liberal education requirements.

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY DUAL TRACK*

Biochemists study molecules found in living organisms, particularly proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. The biochemistry major differs from the chemistry major in that biochemistry emphasizes the integration of chemical principles into biological processes from molecular genetics to enzymology. Both majors prepare students to pursue graduate study in biochemistry/chemistry or a related biological science, attend medical or veterinary school, or seek entry-level biochemical/chemical positions in industry. Both programs are experimental sciences, and majors, especially those who plan to pursue graduate studies in the field, should become acquainted with laboratory research approaches beyond those introduced in the formal lab courses. Research options are available through Chem 2094 or 4094 and BioC 4994 and the Honors Program. Students should start planning the research component of their major program as early as possible.

Freshman Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 1061 Chem Principles I (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Chem 1062 Chem Principles II (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Math 1271 Calculus I (4 cr) Math 1272 Calculus II (4 cr)
Phys 1301 Physics I (4 cr) Phys 1302 Physics II (4 cr)
Freshman Writing (4 cr) Biol 2002 Foundational Biology I (5 cr)
   
Sophomore Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 2301 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 2302 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 2101 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr) Chem 2311 Organic Chemistry Lab I (4 cr)
Chem 2111 Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 cr) Biol 3007 Plant Biology (4 cr)
Biol 2003/2004 Foundational Biology II (6 cr) Math 2263 Multivariable Calculus (4 cr)
  Biol 3211/2005 Animal Physiology and lab (4 cr) or Biol 3301
Junior Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 4501 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 4502 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 4701 Inorganic Chemistry Lect (3 cr) BioC 4332 Biochemistry II (4 cr)
BioC 4331 Biochemistry I (4 cr) BioC 4025 Biochemistry Lab (2 cr)
Stat 3021 Intro. to Probability and Statistics (3 cr) Biol 3301 Biology of Microorganisms (5 cr)
   
Senior Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Advanced Chemistry Lecture Elective (3 cr) Advanced Chemistry Lab Elective (2 cr)
Advanced Chemistry Lab Elective (2 cr) BioC 3960 Research Topics in BioChem (1 cr)
Biol 4003 Genetics (3 cr) Biol 4004 Cell Biology (3 cr)

+ May substitute other advanced lab from Biochemsitry (consult advisor)
* Program layout does not contain all college or liberal education requirements.

CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY DUAL TRACK*

Biologists are concerned with the fundamental properties of living things, from the interactions of molecules unique to life through the maintenance and integration of organisms and the interactions of populations in space and time. Both majors prepare students to pursue graduate study in biology/chemistry or a related biological science, attend medical or veterinary school, or seek entry-level biological/chemical positions in industry. Both programs are experimental sciences, and majors, especially those who plan to pursue graduate studies in the field, should become acquainted with laboratory research approaches beyond those introduced in the formal lab courses. Research options are available through Chem 2094 or 4094. Students should start planning the research component of their major program as early as possible.

Freshman Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 1061 Chem Principles I (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Chem 1062 Chem Principles II (3 cr) 1065 lab (1 cr)
Math 1271 Calculus I (4 cr) Math 1272 Calculus II (4 cr)
Phys 1301 Physics I (4 cr) or 1201 Phys 1302 Physics II (4 cr) or 1202
Freshman Writing (4 cr) Biol 2002 Foundations of Biology I (5 cr)
Biol 1805 The Nature of Life (2 cr)  
   
Sophomore Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 2301 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 2302 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 2101 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr) Chem 2311 Organic Chemistry Lab I (4 cr)
Chem 2111 Analytical Chemistry Lab (2 cr) Math 2263 Multivariable Calculus (4 cr)
Biol 2003 Foundations of Biology II (3 cr) Organismal Biology choose from animal,
Biol 2004 Foundations of Biology Lab (3 cr) plant or microbiology (4-5 cr)
   
Junior Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Chem 4501 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr) Chem 4502 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr)
Chem 4701 Inorganic Chemistry Lect (3 cr) Stat 3021 Intro. to Probability and Statistics (3 cr)
BioC 3021 Biochemistry (3 cr) Biol 3407/3409/3411 choose from ecology,
  evolution, or animal behavior (3 cr)
Senior Year  
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Advanced Chemistry Lecture Elective (3 cr) Advanced Chemistry Lab Elective (2 cr)
Advanced Chemistry Lab Elective (2 cr) Biol 4004 Cell Biology (3 cr)
Biol 4003 Genetics (3 cr) Directed Research (3 cr)
Directed Research (3 cr)  

+ Select 2 labs. See CBS for list of options
* Program layout does not contain all college or liberal education requirements.

CHEMISTRY AND BIO-BASED PRODUCTS ENG. MINOR

This program is designed for the student who wishes to get a minor in Bio-based Products Engineering along with a Chemistry degree. Bio-based products are materials, chemicals, and energy derived from renewable, bio-resources including forestry, agriculture and other biomass. A minor in bio-based products engineering enables a student to gain a better understanding of and appreciation for sustainable use of the renewable resources. Since the minor consists of 14 credits of specific BP courses students interested in the minor should contact the Department of Bio-based Products in the College of Natural Resources. Scholarships are available to qualified chemistry majors taking selected BP courses. See either department for further information.

Complete a minimum of 14 credits from the following:
BP 4001—Chemistry of Plant Materials (4 cr)
BP 4301—Surface and Colloid Science in Bio-based Products Manufacturing (3 cr)
BP 4302—Organisms Impacting Bio-based Products (3 cr)
BP 4303—Bio-based Materials Science (3 cr)
BP 4401—Bio-based Products Engineering (4 cr)
BP 4404—Bio-based Composites Engineering (3 cr)
BP 4501—Process and Product Design I (2 cr)
BP 4502W—Process and Product Design II (3 cr)
BP 4305W—Pulp and Paper Technology (3 cr)

It is important to plan ahead since some courses are only offered once a year.

CBS MINORS
To declare a minor in Biochemistry, Biology, Microbiology, or Plant Biology, complete the online form at http://www.cbs.umn.edu/students/cbs-minors

MATH MINOR
Beyond the required Math needed in the CSE Chemistry program:  1271, 1272, 2243, 2263
You will need to take Math 2283 and two 4xxx or 5xxx level courses.

HONORS

University Honors Program

Students admitted to Honors Fall 2008 or later will fulfill UHP Honors Requirements. To get the more information on honors visit:http://honors.umn.edu

Graduating with Distinction and High Distinction

It is possible for students to graduate with distinction, high distinction, or with a Latin honors degree. To graduate with distinction you must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.75. To graduate with high distinction your GPA must be at least 3.9. There are no other requirements for graduating with distinction or high distinction other than these grade point averages.

Students admitted to Honors Fall 2008 or later will fulfill UHP Honors Requirements.  To get the most up to date information on honors visit: http://honors.umn.edu/academics/requirements.html

TOOLS FOR SCHEDULING

The following links will be useful in laying out your program:

Flow chart of pre-requisites for chemistry required courses.

Program Worksheet.

 

 

 
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